Hofstra Law

Association on American Indian Affairs Sequoyah Graduate Fellowship

Category
Fellowship

Dates
Deadline Date: Jun 1st, 2015
Posted Date: Sep 19th, 2011
Criteria

Description
Basic Requirements:
Student must be enrolled in a tribe from the Continental US or Alaska. There is no minimum blood quantum requirement. Student must be enrolled full time both Fall 2015 and Spring 2016 at an accredited institution of higher learning. Your Spring 2016 schedule will not be needed until January 2016.

For information about more Native and non-Native scholarships, click on the Other Scholarships and Internships box below.

Scholarship Options
AAIA Sequoyah Graduate Scholarship
Recognizing that most students have exhausted federal funding that was previously available to them as undergraduate students, as well as the lack of scholarships available to Native American graduate students, AAIA established the Sequoyah Graduate Scholarship in efforts to help fill this need.

This scholarship is open to students in any curriculum who are seeking a Master’s Degree or above.

This scholarship is funded through AAIA’s general scholarship fund, which without the generosity of our donors and members, would not be possible.

This scholarship is for graduate students who are enrolled in federally recognized tribes who are seeking a degree in any curriculum. Each award is $1,500 per school year. $750 is disbursed in late September and $750 is disbursed in late January. This scholarship is for one year only. Students may re-apply on a yearly basis.


AAIA Florence Young Memorial Scholarship
Florence Young was born in San Francisco in 1913. Mrs. Young married Golson Carl Young, Jr. in 1939 and the Young’s along with their son, lived in Alameda County, California for over 60 years.

Mrs. Young had many interests. Mr. Young was on the planning Commission for the City of Newark, California, so Mrs. Young participated in many civic affairs and cared about her community. She was also a wonderful seamstress who sewed her own clothing and did needlework and embroidery.

She and Mr. Young also collected Native American wares. Mrs. Young was thought to gain her interest in Native Americans through the research she conducted on Native American lapidary and jewelry making, which both she and Mr. Young thoroughly enjoyed. Because she was also interested in researching her own heritage and had a strong sense of her roots, she identified with the strong sense of culture experienced within the Native community.

When Mrs. Young passed away in 2000, she named AAIA as the beneficiary of her will. Due to her interest in art and civic and community affairs, the Florence Young Memorial Scholarship was established in her honor and is open to students seeking a degree in art, law or public health.

AAIA is grateful to Mrs. Young’s generosity and concern for Native students. Without the support of people like Mrs. Young, AAIA would not be able to provide as many scholarships to Native students seeking a higher education.

This scholarship is for graduate students who are enrolled in federally recognized tribes and who are seeking a degree in art, law or medicine/public health. Each award is $1,500 per school year. $750 is disbursed in late September and $750 is disbursed in late January. This scholarship is for one year only. Students may re-apply on a yearly basis.


Deadline: June 1, 2015 by 5pm

More Information: See Here and Here

CONTACT INFO:
www.indian-affairs.org
Lisa Wyzlic, Director of Scholarship Programs
Association on American Indian Affairs
966 Hungerford Drive, Suite 12 - B
Rockville, MD 20850
(240) 314-7155

Resources